"Well, there is only one piece of advice I can give you," said the wisest of wise men. "The secret of happiness is to see all the marvels of the world and never to forget the drops of oil on the spoon."



('The Alchemist' Paulo Coelho)




Monday, April 16, 2012

An old dog

Sometimes on my walks with the dogs, I see a couple with a beautiful, if elderly rough collie dog. Although the dog is lovely, he is obviously now having problems with his back legs, as he walks stiffly and slowly, but the other noticeable thing about him is that he always wears a muzzle. On the rare occasions that I have been able to get within talking distance, the lady has explained that he doesn't like other dogs, he is a rescue dog and at the age of ten years or more, it's too late to retrain him now.
His growling and aggressive stance when another dog comes near is evidence indeed that he prefers them to keep their distance and I have frequently turned back and taken another route when I've seen him approaching,  in order to minimise his discomfort and that of his owners, but I am impressed with the couple's patience. They took him on, presumably knowing of his problem, and have devoted  time, energy and love towards providing him with a comfortable home and regular exercise.
His behaviour might not be the best and who knows what he experienced in his earlier life, but he is a lucky dog.

12 comments:

  1. I have a friend who has a rescue dog that he took-in when she was about 8. She always barks like crazy when you stand-up. One can but wonder what happened to her in order that she associates standing-up with such panic (or rage).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rather like our Paddy who steers clear of feet, Cro.

      Delete
  2. Our one remaining dog, an Australian Blue Heeler cross, failed puppy socialisation classes . She hates other dogs and behaves very badly around them. Not such a problem now she is old and all she does is threaten but a nuisance when you are out with her. Having them on a lead makes them more so too I think. Although our poor old thing would love to eat the other dogs alive she has never even thought of biting anyone but her stance and the reputation of Blue Heelers is enough for people to be wary of her.
    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it's such a shame when that happens, Helsie.

      Delete
  3. It's good when someone adopts an older animal as they're often overlooked because of such behaviour. People I know who have done so have said how rewarding it is has been, and generally had few problems. Flighty xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It can be very worthwhile, Flighty.

      Delete
  4. Do you think there might be other Wrexhamites who see you dragging Jake and Paddy and think to themselves "There's two lucky dogs!"? Elsie, who heads kitchen staff in the social club, was very disappointed that you didn't arrive with your two hounds - can't think why.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I take it you are not a great fan of dogs, then, YP??

      Delete
  5. Yes, and there's that wonderful crowd that take in retired greyhounds too.

    I wonder if the pain of arthritis is not helping this collie? My vet calls it the 'invisible' pain. Apparently many dogs (and cats) won't show they are in pain because they have an innate fear of losing their position in the pack...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, you could be right, Katherine. I hadn't thought of that.

      Delete

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails